Other information about settled status UK

If you have permanent residence or indefinite leave to remain

The process of applying to the EU Settlement Scheme is different if you have a permanent residence document or indefinite leave to enter or remain.

 


 

If you have a valid ‘UK permanent residence document’

If you have a valid UK permanent residence document, you’ll have one of the following:

  • a certificate inside your blue ‘residence documentation’ booklet (or pink if you’re a Swiss national)
  • a certificate inside your passport
  • a biometric residence card confirming permanent residence (only if you’re not an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen)

Your document is not a permanent residence document if it has ‘registration certificate’ written on it.

If you’re from the EU, EEA or Switzerland your permanent residence document will say ‘Document Certifying Permanent Residence’.

If you’re not an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen, your biometric residence card will say ‘Permanent Residence Status’.

 


 

What you must do

To continue living in the UK after 30 June 2021 you must either:

  • apply for citizenship before 30 June 2021 (or 31 December 2020 if the UK leaves the EU without a deal)
  • apply to the EU Settlement Scheme - you will not have to prove you have 5 years’ continuous residence

 


 

If you have indefinite leave to enter or remain

Indefinite leave to enter or remain (ILR) are types of immigration status.

You’ll usually have applied for indefinite leave to enter or remain. You’ll have a stamp in your passport or a letter from the Home Office. You could also have a ‘vignette’ (sticker) or a biometric residence permit.

You can continue to live in the UK without applying to the EU Settlement Scheme if you have indefinite leave to enter or remain in the UK. However, if you choose to apply (and meet all the other conditions), you’ll get ‘indefinite leave to remain under the EU Settlement Scheme’ - also known as settled status.

This means you should be able to spend up to 5 years in a row outside the UK without losing your settled status (instead of 2 years with the indefinite leave to enter or remain you have now).

 


 

How long you can live outside the UK is still subject to approval by Parliament.

You will not have to prove you have 5 years’ continuous residence.

 


 

If you moved to the UK before it joined the EU on 1 January 1973

You may have been given ILR automatically if you’re an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen who lived in the UK before 1973. If you were, you will not need to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme to stay in the UK after June 2021.

If you do not have a document confirming your ILR status, you can either:

If you’re from Malta or Cyprus, you could also apply for British citizenship through the Windrush scheme.

 


 

If you're applying for your child

You can apply for settled or pre-settled status for your child if they’re under 21 and either:

  • they’re an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen
  • they are not an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen, but you are - or your spouse or civil partner is

Your child can also apply for themselves.

 


 

If you have applied to the EU Settlement Scheme

You’ll be able to ‘link’ your child’s application to yours, using the application number you got when you applied for yourself.

You can do this at any time after you’ve applied - you do not need to wait for a decision.

You can use your own email address in the application if your child does not have one.

If your own application is successful, your child will get the same status as you.

You will need to do this for each child you want to apply for.

 


 

What proof you need

You’ll need to provide proof of your relationship to your child when you apply.

You will not need to provide proof of your child’s residence in the UK with their application. However the Home Office may ask you for proof of residence before making a decision.

 


 

If you have not applied to the EU Settlement Scheme

If you are eligible for the scheme, it may be easier to make your own application before you apply for your child.

Otherwise you’ll need to provide proof that your child has 5 years’ continuous residence in the UK to be eligible for settled status - or your child will need to if they apply for themselves.

If they have not lived in the UK for a continuous 5-year period, they may be eligible for pre-settled status.

If you are not eligible for the scheme but your child is, for example, because they live in the UK and you do not, you can still apply for them. You’ll need to provide proof of their UK residence.

 


 

If you’re an Irish citizen

You do not need to apply for settled or pre-settled status if you’re an Irish citizen

However, if you’re an Irish citizen and your child is not a British citizen, they’ll be eligible for either:

  • the same status that you could get, based on how long you’ve lived in the UK
  • settled or pre-settled status, based on their own residence

 


 

If you stop working or start work in another EU country

You and your family members can get settled status with less than 5 years’ continuous residence in certain situations.

If you have to stop working

If you’re an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen you may be able to get settled status if you have to stop working or being self-employed because of an accident or illness (known as ‘permanent incapacity’).

You may be able to get settled status if either:

  • you have lived continuously in the UK for the 2 years immediately beforehand
  • the permanent incapacity was the result of an accident at work or an occupational disease that entitles you to a pension from a UK institution

You can also get settled status if you’re married to or in a civil partnership with a British citizen.

If you’re the family member of an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen at the time they stopped working you may also be eligible for settled status.

If you reach State Pension age or retire early

If you’re an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen you may be able to get settled status if you reach State Pension age or retire early.

If you’re the family member of an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen at the time they reach State Pension age or retire early you may also be eligible for settled status.

 


 

If you reach State Pension age

If you’re an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen, you can get settled status if you stopped working when you reached State Pension age and either:

  • you worked continuously or were self employed for 1 year beforehand and have lived continuously in the UK for 3 years
  • your spouse or civil partner is a British citizen

 


 

If you retire early

If you’re an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen you can get settled status if you retire early and either:

  • your spouse or civil partner is a British citizen
  • you worked continuously (for someone other than yourself) for 1 year beforehand and have lived continuously in the UK for 3 years

 


 

If you start work or self-employment in another EU country

If you’re an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen you can get settled status if you start work or self-employment in another EU country and you both:

  • usually return to your UK home once a week
  • have lived and worked or been self-employed in the UK continuously for 3 years beforehand

If you’re the family member of an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen at the time they start work or self-employment in another EU country you may also be eligible for settled status.

 


 

After you've applied

If your application is successful, you’ll be given either settled or pre-settled status. Find out what rights you get for each status.

Viewing and proving your status

If you successfully apply, the Home Office will email you a link to an online service that you can use to view and prove your status.

You will not get a physical document unless both of the following apply:

You can read more information about how to view and prove your status.

 


 

You can still prove your rights in the UK until 31 December 2020 with your passport or national identity card (if you’re an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen), or with your biometric residence document.

 


 

Updating your details

You must keep your details up to date, for example if you get a new passport.

Applying for citizenship

You’ll usually be able to apply for citizenship 12 months after you’ve got settled status.

If you paid for your application

If you paid the fee when you applied to the EU Settlement Scheme you’ll get a refund.

If the Home Office finds a mistake in your application

The Home Office will contact you before making a decision on your application, so you can correct the error.

They’ll also tell you if you need to provide more evidence before they can make a decision.

If your application is unsuccessful

You may be able to apply for an administrative review of the decision.

You cannot currently appeal the decision.

You can apply again at any time until 30 June 2021, or until 31 December 2020 if the UK leaves the EU without a deal.

If you already have an outstanding immigration application

In most cases, your outstanding immigration application will not be considered if you apply for the EU Settlement Scheme. You’ll get a refund for your outstanding application.

Contact UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) to find out how your outstanding immigration application will be affected.

More detailed guidance is available.